3 Step Hideaway – Getting away from it all

3 Step Hideaway – Getting away from it all

3 Step Hideaway Let’s get this right out there – 3 Step Hideaway is a dude ranch for motorcyclists! Last summer, after having ridden the beautiful Valley of the Gods and the Moki Dugway in south Utah, I was on my way to the 3 Step Hideaway. Originally having heard about it from some moto friends, the 3 Step Hideaway is one of the moto-friendly business profiles you’ll find on MotoStays.  Since I was passing through the area on my way back to Seattle, it was a no brainer that I stop in and check it out.  Homesteaded in the 1800’s this property is nestled in rolling hills and valleys of eastern Utah with stunning views as far as the eyes can see and the Colorado Rockies looming in the distance. A destination in its own right, 3 Step Hideaway is conveniently located just over an hour SE of Moab between Moab and Cortez CO.  Backroads with no traffic and with about a .5 mile gravel road makes getting their interesting and pleasant ride (watch out for the deer). It was like riding into a western movie, and I couldn’t help but feel like Clint Eastwood, parking my iron horse out front and dismounting.  Really, it is that cool. As luck would have it, my timing was perfect – I arrived just as a dinner of big fat grilled steaks and corn on the cob were being served up along with a warm greeting by owners Scott & Julie making me feel welcome and right at home.  I washed it all down with cold, regional beers that is served...
What Is Old Is New Again

What Is Old Is New Again

Recently a motorcycle industry friend passed a book published in 1960 my way.  He was doing so as another had done with him. When he said it was on the way my curiosity was peeked to be sure. One more gift from the holiday season… Since he did not tell me what the book was, I simply waited two days for the question to be answered. “Let’s Try Barter” by Charles Morrow Wilson was not exactly what I was expecting.   When I opened it and saw the original publish date of 1960 and revision in 1976 I was even less inspired.   Out of respect and some curiosity I started paging through it.  Glad I did. While Mr. Wilson has a strong opinion and certainly points to the traditional value of barter, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barter) it was the notion that What Is Old Is New Again that caught my attention. (My words, not his.) As it is in this historical cycle and context that http://MotoStays.com makes such great sense. Literally since the dawn of man, we have been sharing residence. How and the details around it are simply reflections of the time. Today, it is EASY for us find accommodation options. The modern age of information makes it much faster than plotting in on horseback looking for the local inn or asking a farmer if you can sleep in his barn. Funny how the world turns: as I sit here and write this post Bob Dylan’s 1964 song ‘Motorpsycho Nitemare’ just played on my Pandora One channel. Righteous timing as this is a folk story about a young adventurous man who needed...
Home Sharing for Motorcyclists in the Modern Age

Home Sharing for Motorcyclists in the Modern Age

This is an excerpt of the piece Derek Roberts did Dec 2014 for Sound RIDER! Please see the full article here. It has been my experience with motorcycling that all conversational roads lead back to one thing; Wanderlust. Appreciation for engineering, technical proficiency and the daily commute may vary, but mention to a fellow rider (or non-rider for that matter) the tale of a recent motorcycle sojourn and you will immediately have a captivated audience. Maybe it’s the innate understanding of a motorcyclist that opportunity comes in many varieties. A sun parched stretch of desert highway, conversations with strangers and meandering trips that start with no end dates, are all blank canvasses. Each time we set out on two wheels we are privy to more than a windows view. Each time, is a unique experience. Emboldened by adventure is often when inspiration strikes. Take for example, MotoStays founders, Tad Haas and Gaila Gutierrez (shown right). Over the course of 411 days, the two traversed the vastness of eastern Canada, crisscrossed the continental United States and explored the culturally rich interior of central Mexico, on a trip that would ultimately cover 40,000 miles and reach as far south as Panama. As the pair rode, they began to take stock of their journey and question fellow travelers as to what made these types of trips, or even weekend ones, so special. Time and again the responses came back littered with reference to “adventure”, “different”, “local” and “real”. The two rider’s appreciation for such experiences had certainly grown since the start of their own trip, as had their appreciation for the most...
Moral Implications of Home Sharing

Moral Implications of Home Sharing

This is a bit of an usual blog post for us, but I think it is worth a read if you believe in the Sharing Economy. Most importantly it highlights many of the reasons we know make home sharing so powerful and important.   The following article appeared in the October 7th 2014 issue of the San Francisco Examiner. Positive Moral Implications of Sharing Home http://www.sfexaminer.com/sanfrancisco/positive-moral-implications-of-sharing-home/Content?oid=2908422.   It was written by Rev. Melinda McLain who lives in Twin Peaks CA. and preaches at the Mira Vista United Church of Christ. My interest in the article is not that she is a pastor and looking at this topic from that point of view, rather it is just how insightful she is and spot on about the value of home sharing. (See below.) I also like her phrase about “having space to share” vs. use of “home sharing.” It usually isn’t the whole house but offering a room etc. that is an important part of the Sharing Economy movement.   This is true whether you are a motorcyclist using MotoStays.com with our pay-it-forward model or AirBnB.com that uses a for-profit plan. You can find the whole article here http://www.sfexaminer.com/sanfrancisco/positive-moral-implications-of-sharing-home/Content?oid=2908422 but I thought it would be valuable to pull out some snippets and share directly. This piece was posted in the Opinions section of the paper as a comment on the San Francisco city vote being taking. This is primarily in regards to the very successful AirBnB model and the implication/impact of their rapid growth. You can learn the deep details here: https://sites.google.com/site/hspositionpaper/. BTW, it should be noted that San Francisco did indeed pass the...
P.L.A.N.S. – Do You Have One?

P.L.A.N.S. – Do You Have One?

  P.L.A.N.S. – Do You Have One? During this very busy summer riding season, we thought a guest post about maintaining our bikes and staying safe would be a good read. As such, Jill Oliver a very accomplished rider and traveler has put together this very useful information.   Most of us have some sort of pre-ride check, some more thorough than others. We think this is simple to remember and execute. Thanks Jill! ———————————————- Zero breakdowns. Is that even possible? Well, that is, will my bike be dependable to do what I want it to do all the time? As an adventure rider, I will say that all bets are off when you eyeball that big mud puddle, thinking, “I can totally ride through the middle of that!” Then you don’t. Or, if you burn up a clutch trying to ride up a road made of baby head sized rocks. You know, stuff like that. You are going to have a self-induced breakdown. I am talking about making sure you can stop, nothing falls off the bike, or you can get from point A to B. Zero breakdowns? Really? Of course you can. Riders for Health (RFH www.Riders.org), an award winning social enterprise, does this every day. Their expertise in fleet management, including motorcycles, enables health care to be delivered all over Africa. They have a zero breakdown policy. See! It is possible. They should know because they maintain vehicles in the worst conditions of sub-Sahara Africa. Granted, they are on agricultural motorcycles that are built like tanks, but the same principles apply to any motorcycle, anywhere in the...
When Should I MotoStay?

When Should I MotoStay?

Prefer to listen?  Here is audio version of this blog: http://motostays.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/When-to-MotoStay.m4a So if you are new to this whole notion of home-sharing and collaborative consumption you might be asking yourself when is the right time to MotoStay? When should I set up a first visit or hosting experience? The simple answer is right now. Many of the early MotoStayers and people expressing interest in this new model for travel think it is mostly just for long-term or adventure travelers.   Definitely NOT the case. MotoStays and other home sharing sites like www.Couchsurfing.org and www.Airbnb.com are established to help you with all of your travel needs. Whether you are riding in a nearby town or across the world for an epic vacation. The difference and advantage of MotoStays is we cater specifically to riders! Here are two recent examples of how and why MotoStays works for short trips too. This past week Gaila and I hosted Phoenix when she rode down from Vancouver British Columbia to catch a flight from Seattle to California for an upcoming wedding. How pleasant it was to share dinner, stories and smiles. Not to mention the great chocolate she brought! We learned more about her temporary home in B.C. – giving us even more incentive to take a weekend trip up North. High on the “todo” list. Second, I needed to be southwest of Olympia WA to teach a Learn To Ride dirt bike class for Puget Sound Safety Off-Road www.pssor.com this past Sunday. (It was great fun!) Living 80 miles away means this was going to be quite a long haul – even before the infamous...